Local Attractions

Upcoming Community Events

Local Attractions

Rusty the Tin Dog

Tin Dog Creek Walk Trail

Town Heritage Walk Trail

Dowerin and Districts Museum

Wheatbelt Heritage Rail

The Vision

History of the Project

Wildflowers and Reserves

Dowerin has several reserves within the Shire boundaries which are home to an array of wildflowers and native bush and are abundant with wildlife.

Most wildflowers can be observed between July and October but as wildflowers are heavily dependent on the amount of rain that has fallen during winter, so the more rain, the more wildflowers there are to enjoy.

Hot spots include the Tin Dog Creek Reserve, Namelcatchem Reserve and Minnivale Reserve. Some orchid species that have been spotted include the Donkey, Bunny, Leek and Spider. Many species of flowering wattles, grevillea and hakea can be seen on road verges and throughout the reserves in Dowerin.

The striking Blue Dampiera, named after William Dampier who landed on the west coast of Australia in 1699, is also common on roadsides and in Reserves. Pink, white and yellow everlastings can sometimes form a carpet of colour in late August through to October.

The rare Sandpaper Wattle can be seen at the Dowerin Rare Flora Garden in the Town Centre (next to the public toilets), as well as Daviesia euphorbioides or Wongan Cactus, Microcorys eremophiloides or Wongan Microcorys and Wongan conostylis.

WILDFLOWERS 2

Minnivale nature Reserve

Namelcatchem nature Reserve

Tin Dog Creek Reserve

Many species of orchids including Donkey, Bunny, Blue and Pink Fairies, Clown, Leek and Spider can be found in the Tin Dog Creek during winter and spring if decent winter rains have fallen.

The Eucalyptus pyriformis, otherwise known as the Dowerin Rose or Pear-fruited Mallee and is seen in dense populations throughout the Tin Dog Creek Reserve. It is a smooth grey barked mallee which blooms a beautiful red flower in early spring.

Why not take a stroll along the Tin Dog Creek Walk Trail and pass through a dense stand of Melaleuca – Honey Myrtle Species. It is one of the richest Melaleuca areas and has remarkable diversity in this reserve.

Dowerin Fields Days

The Dowerin GWN7 Machinery Field Days is an agricultural expo located in the Central Wheatbelt of Western Australia. The event has continually expanded over the past 51 years to become the largest and most successful event of its kind in the state. With a strong reputation, which is widely recognised throughout Australia, the Dowerin Field Days are classed as being among the three largest agricultural machinery events in the country.

The small Wheatbelt community swells from a population of a few hundred to over 24,000 throughout the two days in August. The number of exhibitors continues to grow each year and reached a historic 700 in 2015. Exhibitors and visitors travel from all over the state, country and increasingly overseas.

The Field Days provide businesses, offering a wide range of products and services, with an opportunity to showcase their capabilities and promote their brand to a targeted audience. Exhibitors range from manufacturers and distributors of farm machinery and allied equipment, rural services, information technology to lifestyle and leisure products and services. The Dowerin Field Days are a valuable shop window to the farming community.

The outstanding efforts from members of the community in contributing time, energy and expertise, ensures visitors and exhibitors enjoy the benefit of a well organised and professional managed event. As a not-for-profit community owned and operated event, income generated is injected back into Dowerin and surrounding towns, contributing to the success and survival of the region. The event is symbolic of rural communities helping themselves.

The Dowerin GWN7 Machinery Field Days will continue to encourage exhibitors to meet the trends, expectations and needs of the many diverse groups who rely on the annual event for information on the very latest developments in machinery, computers, finance, cropping and rural lifestyles. The board continues to investigate various proposals which will provide facilities and services to meet the emerging demands of a changing market place.

The Dowerin Field Days event will take place on the last Wednesday and Thursday of August annually.

History

From a humble suggestion for raising funds to water a tennis court in 1964, today the Dowerin GWN7 Machinery Field Days has put Dowerin on the map as the biggest rural event in Western Australia and a "must attend" showcase for people from all walks of life. Held in Dowerin on the last Wednesday and Thursday in August this event continues to attract tens of thousands of people to the Wheatbelt.

As broadacre farming evolves and other influences make themselves felt, the Dowerin GWN7 Machinery Field Days continue a natural evolution. Technology is an essential part of broadacre farming, with the use of computers and satellite beamed information and these days, computer displays share space with farm machinery. Lifestyle farms are moving closer to centres such as Dowerin, it's possible to run many consultant type businesses from rural areas and already the ’bush change’ lifestyle has seen smaller tractors dominate farm machinery sales across Australia Horticulture, aquaculture and olive tree farming have reached the wheatbelt, as has the production of trees, such as Blue Gums and Paulowina.

The Dowerin GWN7 Machinery Field Days will continue to encourage exhibitors to meet the trends, expectations and needs of the many diverse groups who rely on the annual event for information on the very latest developments in machinery, computers, finance, cropping and rural lifestyles. The board continues to investigate various proposals which will provide facilities and services to meet the emerging demands of a changing market place.

Board Members
President Vice-President
Nadine McMorran Andrew Todd
Staff
Kahli Rose info@dowerinfielddays.com.au
Tiffany Davey catering@dowerinfielddays.com.au
Jen Millsteed admin@dowerinfielddays.com.au
Dowerin Field Days Office 08 9631 1021

For more information regarding the Dowerin Field Day or Dowerin Events Management please click here to visit the official website.

Dowerin Lakes & Old Dowerin

The name of the Shire and the town site of Dowerin is derived from the aboriginal word “Daren” given to a series of lakes – once fresher, some 8-10 kilometres south of the town. It was originally established as a watering hole and resting place for prospectors and travellers on their way to the goldfields.

It was first settled in 1895, but the railway in 1906 was unable to be built in the area and as a consequence, the town site was moved to the present site.

There is a brass plaque marking the spot where the original town reserve once stood.

Rabbit Proof Fence 2

Runs north/south through the eastern third of the shire, this fence was built in 1907- 1908 and much of it remains in good condition. Mileposts mark the distance from the south coast.

The fence originally went from Point Anne to north of Cue, where it turned east to join Rabbit Proof Fence No. 1 at Gum Creek. It is one of three long fences in the state designed to control the rabbit plague, which could wreak enormous havoc in agricultural areas. The fences failed in their purpose, although much time and money were expended to make them work.

They stand as a monument to human intention to control a pest, which was and is a national problem. The fences are an indication of the widely held fear of the rabbit invasion and the limited and desperate ideas used to control the pest.

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